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South East is a hotbed for microbusinesses

The South East of England and London is a hotbed for micro entrepreneurship, with over 700,000 microbusinesses located in the region, according to new research. An analysis from Direct Line for Business reveals there are over two million microbusinesses

The South East of England and London is a hotbed for micro entrepreneurship, with over 700,000 microbusinesses located in the region, according to new research.

An analysis from Direct Line for Business reveals there are over two million microbusinesses with fewer than nine employees across Britain. London alone has more than 400,000 microbusinesses, accounting for 18% of the UK total.

The capital is followed by the South East (337,385 microbusinesses) and the East of England (216,700 microbusinesses) as the UK's microbusinesses hotspots.

Nick Breton, head of Direct Line for Business, said: 'Britain is a nation of entrepreneurs, as highlighted by the fact that there are nearly 34 microbusinesses for every 1,000 people in the UK.

These enterprises account for 89% of all companies across the UK, which is a huge contribution to the business economy.'

 

Note: News bulletin content has been provided by a third-party and is not the opinion of Santander.

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